Safety Culture Excellence®

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The Program Mentality

February 25th, 2015

In spite of some progress toward strategic thinking, safety efforts remain largely program- or process-minded.  This is kindred thinking to the “more is better” and the “silver bullet” mentality of the past three decades.  Organizations think the new program is going to be the add-on to their existing efforts producing the magic that gets them to zero.  Consultants and trainers answer this demand and produce product-and-process things to sell to organizations.  The chase to fail less this year than last goes on.

The vast majority of organizations we assess do NOT need a new program or process.  In fact, most need to get rid of some of their existing ones rather than add new ones.  More is not better; only better is better, and adding on to failing or falling-short efforts is not the answer.  None of the programs or processes are silver bullets or magic pills.  Once an organization begins to press the limits of programmatic and new-process thinking, the way forward is almost always a strategic approach.  Strategies are more successful at producing reduction rather than simply adding more programs.

 

 

-Terry L. Mathis

 

For more insights, visit 

www.ProActSafety.com

 

Terry L. Mathis is the founder and CEO of ProAct Safety, an international safety and performance excellence firm. He is known for his dynamic presentations in the fields of behavioral and cultural safety, leadership, and operational performance, and is a regular speaker at ASSE, NSC, and numerous company and industry conferences. EHS Today listed Terry as a Safety Guru in ‘The 50 People Who Most Influenced EHS three consecutive times. He has been a frequent contributor to industry magazines for over 15 years and is the coauthor of STEPS to Safety Culture Excellence (2013, WILEY).

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376 - The Rationale for Safety Excellence

February 23rd, 2015

Greetings everyone, this podcast recorded while in Dallas, TX. I’d like to share an article Terry Mathis wrote that was published in EHS Magazine. The published article can either be found on the magazine’s website or under Insights at www.ProActSafety.com

I hope you enjoy the podcast this week. If you would like access to archived podcasts (older than 90 days – dating back to January 2008) please visit www.ProActSafety.com/Store. For more detailed strategies to achieve and sustain excellence in performance and culture, pick up a copy of our book, STEPS to Safety Culture Excellence - http://proactsafety.com/insights/steps-to-safety-culture-excellence

Have a great week!

Shawn M. Galloway
ProAct Safety
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The Temporarily Impossible File

February 18th, 2015

Sometimes in safety, it can seem impossible to fix a problem or identify the cause of a rash of accidents, or find the best way to get workers more engaged.  Safety people are problem-solvers, and unsolved problems are a thorn in their side.  It helps to remember that everything is impossible until we figure it out.  It was once considered impossible to split an atom, run a mile in less than four minutes, or even for human beings to fly. 

Many organizations that strive for safety excellence keep a “temporarily impossible” file in which they list issues and problems that have not been addressed or solved.  They pull it out from time to time and review the issues and problems in light of recent changes and advances.  A few each year get removed from the list and out of the file.  The world is full of miraculous possibilities patiently waiting for our wits to grow sharper.

 

 

-Terry L. Mathis

 

For more insights, visit 

www.ProActSafety.com

 

Terry L. Mathis is the founder and CEO of ProAct Safety, an international safety and performance excellence firm. He is known for his dynamic presentations in the fields of behavioral and cultural safety, leadership, and operational performance, and is a regular speaker at ASSE, NSC, and numerous company and industry conferences. EHS Today listed Terry as a Safety Guru in ‘The 50 People Who Most Influenced EHS three consecutive times. He has been a frequent contributor to industry magazines for over 15 years and is the coauthor of STEPS to Safety Culture Excellence (2013, WILEY).

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375 - Motivating Measurement

February 16th, 2015

Greetings all, here is a short video for this week's podcast. I hope it gets you thinking!

Shawn M. Galloway
President, ProAct Safety
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Watch Now:
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Winning in the Post-Season

February 11th, 2015

Many sports teams who have a good season develop high hopes for a good play-off performance only to be badly disappointed.  It seems that play intensifies in the post-season when only the best teams are left and winning is contingent on more than the basics.  Safety has some similarities:  going from poor performance to better performance comes with the basics and reasonable effort.  But when only a few accidents remain per year, preventing them takes a whole new level of effort.

The biggest mistake in both these scenarios is assuming that the strategy that got you to this point will get you the rest of the way to top.  The problem is that the tools of “bad-to-good” don’t work on “good-to-excellent.”  That game plan and those tools must form the basis of your effort, but winning will take a dose of “above and beyond.”  The last remaining risks aren’t always visible to the naked eye and a whole new level of analysis is needed.  When you get rid of the obvious risks, the next level is less obvious.  When you eliminate the high-probability risks, the remaining ones are lower probability and harder to detect.  Excellence is a whole new game overlaid on the old game.  When you get to the playoffs, develop a new game plan. 

 

-Terry L. Mathis

 

For more insights, visit 

www.ProActSafety.com

 

Terry L. Mathis is the founder and CEO of ProAct Safety, an international safety and performance excellence firm. He is known for his dynamic presentations in the fields of behavioral and cultural safety, leadership, and operational performance, and is a regular speaker at ASSE, NSC, and numerous company and industry conferences. EHS Today listed Terry as a Safety Guru in ‘The 50 People Who Most Influenced EHS three consecutive times. He has been a frequent contributor to industry magazines for over 15 years and is the coauthor of STEPS to Safety Culture Excellence (2013, WILEY).

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374 - Should Safety Pros Work Themselves Out Of Their Jobs?

February 9th, 2015

Greetings everyone, this podcast recorded while in Auburn Hills, MI. I’d like to share an article I wrote that was published in BIC Magazine. The published article can either be found on the magazine’s website or under Insights at www.ProActSafety.com

I hope you enjoy the podcast this week. If you would like access to archived podcasts (older than 90 days – dating back to January 2008) please visit www.ProActSafety.com/Store. For more detailed strategies to achieve and sustain excellence in performance and culture, pick up a copy of our book, STEPS to Safety Culture Excellence - http://proactsafety.com/insights/steps-to-safety-culture-excellence

Have a great week!

Shawn M. Galloway
ProAct Safety
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Listen Now:


Inside or Out?

February 4th, 2015

I used to ask the airline pilot who lived across the street to suggest things to my teenager because he accepted them better from him than from his dad.  Organizations have similar leanings; they prefer to get new ideas either from inside or outside.  Some organizations are highly specialized and it is hard for outsiders to deeply understand their issues. They tend to prefer to listen to experts from within their ranks.  Other organizations believe everyone on the inside thinks alike and new ideas need to come from outside experts or other organizations.

It is important to detect and understand which of these tendencies your organization has and to work with it rather than against it.  External organizations should outsource training and speaking, and lean heavily on subject-matter experts to bring in new ideas.  Internal organizations can still use outside expertise, but should consider bringing it into the mainstream through train-the-trainer and internal-consultant models that share the expertise with insiders who then, in turn, share it with the rest of the organization.   The message is important, but the messenger can spoil it if you ignore where your organization prefers to get its new ideas.

 

-Terry L. Mathis

 

For more insights, visit 

www.ProActSafety.com

 

Terry L. Mathis is the founder and CEO of ProAct Safety, an international safety and performance excellence firm. He is known for his dynamic presentations in the fields of behavioral and cultural safety, leadership, and operational performance, and is a regular speaker at ASSE, NSC, and numerous company and industry conferences. EHS Today listed Terry as a Safety Guru in ‘The 50 People Who Most Influenced EHS three consecutive times. He has been a frequent contributor to industry magazines for over 15 years and is the coauthor of STEPS to Safety Culture Excellence (2013, WILEY).

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Personal Development – The Books I Read January 2015

February 3rd, 2015

  1. Consciousness and the Brain: Deciphering How the Brain Codes Our Thoughts by Stanislas Dehaene
  2. The War of Art: Break Through the Blocks and Win Your Inner Creative Battles by Steven Pressfield and Shawn Coyne
  3. The Effortless Experience: Conquering the New Battleground for Customer Loyalty by Matthew Dixon, Nick Toman, Rick DeLisi
  4. The Second Machine Age: Work, Progress, and Prosperity in a Time of Brilliant Technologies by Erik Brynjolfsson and Andrew McAfee
  5. Stuff Every Man Should Know by Brett Cohen

...And of course please consider adding our book, STEPS to Safety Culture Excellence (Mathis, Galloway) to your reading list! – www.STEPStoSafetyCultureExcellence.com 

Happy reading!
Shawn M. Galloway

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373 - Misusing Negative Consequences

February 2nd, 2015

Greetings all, here is a short video for this week's podcast. I hope it gets you thinking!

Shawn M. Galloway
President, ProAct Safety
1sceapp.jpg
Play Now
Watch Now:
...
  
.. ..

Leading and Managing Safety

January 28th, 2015

If safety is truly a value, and not just a changing priority in an organization, it must be led by the leader of the organization, not simply delegated to a safety professional.  Other values such as integrity or honesty are not delegated, but led and demonstrated by organizational leaders.

Many safety professionals are titled as safety managers and, as such, can be delegated the job of managing the safety activities and recordkeeping of the organization.  However, if these safety managers are expected to truly lead safety, they find themselves competing with the organizational leaders of finance, engineering or sales. This very delegation suggests that the true goal of the organization is being led by the leader and everything else is less important.   Safety becomes a sub-culture led by a sub-leader and takes a secondary and non-integrated priority in the minds of workers.  This division can lead to a dichotomy or conflict of priorities in which workers have to choose between pleasing the boss of production or the boss of safety.

Leading safety means establishing the value and walking the talk.  Workers take cues from organizational leaders about what is most important.  Leaders who regularly talk about safety and lead by personal example make the job of the safety manager much more fluid and truly integrate safety as a core organizational value that is woven into the fabric of daily work.

 

-Terry L. Mathis

 

For more insights, visit 

www.ProActSafety.com

 

Terry L. Mathis is the founder and CEO of ProAct Safety, an international safety and performance excellence firm. He is known for his dynamic presentations in the fields of behavioral and cultural safety, leadership, and operational performance, and is a regular speaker at ASSE, NSC, and numerous company and industry conferences. EHS Today listed Terry as a Safety Guru in ‘The 50 People Who Most Influenced EHS three consecutive times. He has been a frequent contributor to industry magazines for over 15 years and is the coauthor of STEPS to Safety Culture Excellence (2013, WILEY).

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