Safety Culture Excellence®

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367 - Common Practice: The Third Level of Leading Indicators

December 22nd, 2014

Greetings everyone, this podcast recorded while in Akeley, MN. I’d like to share an article Terry Mathis wrote that was published in EHS Today Magazine. The published article can either be found on the magazine’s website or under Insights at www.ProActSafety.com

I hope you enjoy the podcast this week. If you would like to download or play on demand our other podcasts, please visit the ProAct Safety’s podcast website at: http://www.safetycultureexcellence.com. If you would like access to archived podcasts (older than 90 days – dating back to January 2008) please visit www.ProActSafety.com/Store. For more detailed strategies to achieve and sustain excellence in performance and culture, pick up a copy of our book, STEPS to Safety Culture Excellence - http://proactsafety.com/insights/steps-to-safety-culture-excellence

Have a great week!

Shawn M. Galloway
ProAct Safety
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Checking Off the Box

December 17th, 2014

When can good safety practices go bad?  When they become routine and quit adding value to the daily safety of workers.  In short, when they are completed just to check off the box that says they are completed.  This seldom happens intentionally.  

Most safety programs and activities have very specific goals to increase safety awareness or engagement, provide pre-job planning, or just to keep safety on everyone’s’ mind.  But when programs stress the quantity without the quality and do not focus on capturing or delivering value, they can become meaningless activities.

Safety moments in meetings, JSAs, audits, observations, refresher training, safety toolbox meetings, all of these can add value or become valueless activities based on how they are carried out.  As soon as any safety activity is speedily “checked off” just to get it done, the opportunity to continue doing it this way appears.  It is incumbent on everyone to question the value of safety efforts and not let them become meaningless.  

This means leaders must listen to workers regularly and keep in touch with the reality of shop-floor safety.  If doing it poorly ever becomes acceptable, the die is cast.  In this, as in most safety efforts, prevention is preferable to reaction.

-Terry L. Mathis

For more insights, visit www.ProActSafety.com

Terry L. Mathis is the founder and CEO of ProAct Safety, an international safety and performance excellence firm. He is known for his dynamic presentations in the fields of behavioral and cultural safety, leadership, and operational performance, and is a regular speaker at ASSE, NSC, and numerous company and industry conferences. EHS Today listed Terry as a Safety Guru in ‘The 50 People Who Most Influenced EHS in 2010, 2011 and 2012-2013. He has been a frequent contributor to industry magazines for over 15 years and is the coauthor of STEPS to Safety Culture Excellence, 2013, WILEY.

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366 - Managing With Luck or Purposeful Intent?

December 15th, 2014

Greetings all, here is a short video for this week's podcast. I hope it gets you thinking!

Shawn M. Galloway
President, ProAct Safety

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Do You Have a Scoreboard?

December 10th, 2014

The only thing more amazing to me than the number of programs organizations adopt to improve safety, is the fact that the majority don’t have a metric to determine if the program worked or not.  

Using lagging indicators to measure the effectiveness of a new safety program is fraught with inaccuracies.  So many factors impact TRIR and severity rates that one new program might or might not have had an impact.  Add to that fact the concept of Hawthorne Effect (that any focus of effort might impact results short term) and you have a totally unreliable metric of program success.

First, all programs should fit into an overarching safety strategy.  Second, the program should have internal KPIs to determine if it is doing what it is designed to do.  Third, the organization should have intermediate indicators to determine if the program is changing perceptions and organizational behavior.  Lastly, there should be a division of lagging indicators into categories directly impacted by the program to see if they are responding to the combination of program impact, changes in perceptions and behavior, and if the costs of the program create an ROI worthy of the effort.

-Terry L. Mathis

For more insights, visit www.ProActSafety.com

Terry L. Mathis is the founder and CEO of ProAct Safety, an international safety and performance excellence firm. He is known for his dynamic presentations in the fields of behavioral and cultural safety, leadership, and operational performance, and is a regular speaker at ASSE, NSC, and numerous company and industry conferences. EHS Today listed Terry as a Safety Guru in ‘The 50 People Who Most Influenced EHS in 2010, 2011 and 2012-2013. He has been a frequent contributor to industry magazines for over 15 years and is the coauthor of STEPS to Safety Culture Excellence, 2013, WILEY.
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365 - Safety Must Deliver More Than Customers Expect

December 8th, 2014

Greetings everyone, this podcast recorded while in Nashville, TN. I’d like to share an article I wrote that was published in ISHN Magazine. The published article can either be found on the magazine’s website or under Insights at www.ProActSafety.com

I hope you enjoy the podcast this week. If you would like to download or play on demand our other podcasts, please visit the ProAct Safety’s podcast website at: http://www.safetycultureexcellence.com. If you would like access to archived podcasts (older than 90 days – dating back to January 2008) please visit www.ProActSafety.com/Store. For more detailed strategies to achieve and sustain excellence in performance and culture, pick up a copy of our book, STEPS to Safety Culture Excellence - http://proactsafety.com/insights/steps-to-safety-culture-excellence

Have a great week!

Shawn M. Galloway
ProAct Safety
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Listen Now:


Personal Development – The Books I Read November 2014

December 4th, 2014

  1. Thanks for the Feedback: The Science and Art of Receiving Feedback Well by Douglas Stone and Sheila Heen
  2. Scaling Up Excellence: Getting to More Without Settling for Less by Robert I. Sutton and Huggy Rao
  3. What You’re Really Meant to Do: A Road Map for Reaching Your Unique Potential by Robert Steven Kaplan

And of course please consider adding our book, STEPS to Safety Culture Excellence (Mathis, Galloway) to your reading list! – www.STEPStoSafetyCultureExcellence.com 

Happy reading!
Shawn M. Galloway

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364 - Inspire Not to Do But to Feel

December 1st, 2014

Greetings all, here is a short video for this week's podcast. I hope it gets you thinking!

Shawn M. Galloway
President, ProAct Safety

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363 - CEO: Indict or Invite in Safety?

November 24th, 2014

Greetings everyone, this podcast recorded while in Freeport, TX. I’d like to share an article I wrote that was published in BIC Magazine. The published article can either be found on the magazine’s website or under Insights at www.ProActSafety.com

I hope you enjoy the podcast this week. If you would like to download or play on demand our other podcasts, please visit the ProAct Safety’s podcast website at: http://www.safetycultureexcellence.com. If you would like access to archived podcasts (older than 90 days – dating back to January 2008) please visit www.ProActSafety.com/Store. For more detailed strategies to achieve and sustain excellence in performance and culture, pick up a copy of our book, STEPS to Safety Culture Excellence - http://proactsafety.com/insights/steps-to-safety-culture-excellence

Have a great week!

Shawn M. Galloway
ProAct Safety

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Listen Now:


Zero Injuries: What is Really Wrong?

November 19th, 2014

The talk about “zero injuries” has ranged from the ridiculous to the sublime.  Yes, you should not have a tolerance for accidents, ergo set a goal of zero.  Yes, it is not acceptable to hurt ANYONE, ergo set a goal of zero.  However, a goal is not a strategy.  A goal is not a call to action nor a roadmap to success.  Bottom line, zero injuries is a reactive definition of excellence.  Zero is not what you should do nor is it what you should not do.  It is the desired outcome, not the game plan.  It is the coach telling the team at half time, “Don’t lose!”

True safety excellence is not a lofty goal or dream of perfection.  It is a strategic approach to a specific challenge.  The approach must be prescriptive and predictive.  It must involve specific approaches to foster greater knowledge, skills and involvement.  It must communicate and inspire discretionary effort from those involved.  It must include meaningful metrics that are leading indicators and give each worker a way to rate his or her own performance on a daily basis.  

Simply saying “Zero Injuries” is none of these.  It is just a good sounding slogan which is temporarily accomplished by luck or normal variation more often than it is permanently accomplished by solid strategy and execution.

-Terry L. Mathis

For more insights, visit www.ProActSafety.com

Terry L. Mathis is the founder and CEO of ProAct Safety, an international safety and performance excellence firm. He is known for his dynamic presentations in the fields of behavioral and cultural safety, leadership, and operational performance, and is a regular speaker at ASSE, NSC, and numerous company and industry conferences. EHS Today listed Terry as a Safety Guru in ‘The 50 People Who Most Influenced EHS in 2010, 2011 and 2012-2013. He has been a frequent contributor to industry magazines for over 15 years and is the coauthor of STEPS to Safety Culture Excellence, 2013, WILEY.

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362 - Implement Through Ownership

November 17th, 2014

Greetings all, here is a short video for this week's podcast. I hope it gets you thinking!

Shawn M. Galloway
President, ProAct Safety

1sceapp.jpg
Play Now
Watch Now:
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